7 Fatal Flaws Common in Press Releases

Press Releases are a good way to promote the products you sell or the website you sell them with. Obviously, you have to make sure you take all the steps to use them properly, such as including your back-link either in the article or resource box, tweeting the release once it's published, posting it on your Facebook fan page, etc. Done properly, a well-written release can be a valuable asset for your business. But don't overlook the crafting of the press release as the important step it is. Creating a press release to promote your product or e-commerce website requires thought and preparation. Here are seven mistakes people commonly make when writing a press release.

1. Lack of proper research. Read and subscribe to press releases not only in your own niche, but from some of the larger and more successful companies in the world. See how they are structured and worded. Incorporate the structural features you like into your own releases.

2. Rash Assumptions. Your reader may know nothing about your products or website. One goal of a press release is to have your reader generate buzz to their readers or media outlet, so lay out the specifics for them.

3. Condescension. While fatal flaw #2 says to be specific with what you are writing, be careful not to write in a condescending tone. It's a sure way to turn readers off. Assume your readers are reasonably intelligent.

4. Overselling. The purpose of a press release is to put information into the hands of those who have influence and a crowd to share it with. They are not the ones who will be buying or using whatever is in the contents of your press release. Don't try to make them the buyer. Rather, look at them as your reseller and present the information in the same way you would teach a sales associate how to sell to a customer in a store.

5. Bloat. A press release is not an article. It should be informative and easily digestible; keep the fluff to a minimum and focus on the details that pertain to your service, product, or website.

6. Dull titles. Look at your deleted email folder to see which messages you deleted without opening. Chances are the subject line didn't entice you to open it. Be creative and direct with your title. It can mean the success or failure of your release.

7. Incorrect or outdated information. Wait until you have all the facts, specifics, and proper information included in your press release, then send it. Don't send a release announcing a forthcoming release, either. It will break the trust of your readers. You're better off sitting on a release for a few days than sending it out missing crucial information.

Avoid these simple mistakes in your press releases and the information in them will be more likely to get used. As with all writing, re-read it, proof it, and then read it again to ensure it flows smoothly and conveys the exact message you need it to. Finally, remember to tweet your release and post it to your Facebook fan page to help boost exposure.

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